E-shops

An Ice-Cream Parlor Where Time Stands Still – The New York Times

Summary

In this series for T, the author Reggie Nadelson revisits New York institutions that have defined cool for decades, from time-honored restaurants to unsung dives.

It’s easy enough to find banana and fudge or banana caramel ice cream at your local deli these days, but the flavor I miss from my childhood, and which is far harder to track down, is just plain banana. No chocolate, no nuts. It tasted only of cream, bananas and sugar, …….

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In this series for T, the author Reggie Nadelson revisits New York institutions that have defined cool for decades, from time-honored restaurants to unsung dives.

It’s easy enough to find banana and fudge or banana caramel ice cream at your local deli these days, but the flavor I miss from my childhood, and which is far harder to track down, is just plain banana. No chocolate, no nuts. It tasted only of cream, bananas and sugar, and was much more luscious and profound than the sum of its parts. At Eddie’s Sweet Shop in Forest Hills, Queens, it is just as I remember it, as if seasoned with a dash of nostalgia.

Often described as New York’s longest surviving ice cream parlor, Eddie’s is a neighborhood institution beloved for both its frozen confections and the fact that it has remained pretty much unchanged since Giuseppe Citrano, an immigrant from Southern Italy, bought it in 1968. According to the Rego-Forest Preservation Council, there has likely been a soda fountain at the address, a two-story red brick building at 105-29 Metropolitan Avenue, since at least the late 1940s, when William Witt, a German American, opened Witt’s Ice Cream Parlor there. But it was Citrano who made the place Eddie’s. Apparently there was no Eddie, and Citrano’s son Vito often jokes that his father must have reckoned that if he didn’t put his own name on the door, should a customer have a grievance, they wouldn’t get mad at him. With his father, Citrano is said to have coined the slogan “Take your children to the place your grandparents had ice cream.”

Unsurprisingly, then, Vito (who took over in the early 2000s) and his wife, Angelina, who own and run the store now, aim to keep Eddie’s as it has always been. Even the metal boat-shaped dishes for banana splits are vintage, with some dating back to the shop’s early days.

In fact, Eddie’s entire interior evokes a bygone age — or the drugstore from Thornton Wilder’s 1938 play “Our Town,” perhaps. To your left as you enter is a long marble counter with wood-topped swivel stools. Along the wall behind it is an elaborate wood built-in with mirrors and slots for printed cards bearing the names of ice cream flavors: butter pecan, maple walnut, cherry vanilla, vanilla fudge, mint chip. On a ledge, large glass jars hold syrups, and there is an ancient-looking green metal machine for making malts and milkshakes, as well as an enameled refrigerator that, according to Vito, “is at least 80 years old but still works.” The original ceiling overhead is made of pressed tin, the floor out of hexagonal green and white tiles, and …….

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/25/t-magazine/eddies-sweet-shop-queens.html